Andy Chow

Journalist/Producer

Contact Andy at achow@statehousenews.org.

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Some lawmakers are looking for a way to bring legal sports betting to Ohio. The move is in reaction to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing states to regulate gambling on sports. Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports.

Farmers are firing back at Gov. John Kasich’s executive order to implement tougher regulations on fertilizer and other farm runoff. The administration says these new requirements will help keep nutrients from polluting Lake Erie. But farmers argue this creates mandates for a problem they’re already trying to fix. 

Andy Chow

Democratic leaders are calling on the state to release some of the $2.7 billion in the state’s Rainy Day Fund. As Statehoue correspondent Andy Chow reports, one senator says that money can be used to invest in the people.

Karen Kasler

Credit unions are disagreeing with claims that they will directly benefit from a new bill that’s written to crack down on the payday lending industry. As the credit unions argue, they’re already operating from a different, tough set of rules. 

Andy Chow

Members of Congress left Capitol Hill and held a special meeting in Columbus on the national pension crisis. Pension plans for more than a million union workers and retirees are in danger of collapse if something isn’t done soon. More than 60,000 Ohio workers could be impacted.

Andy Chow

Thousands of union workers and retirees flocked to the Statehouse from around the country. They’re rallying in Columbus for a fix to what they see as a national pension crisis – the day before a field hearing by a Congressional committee examining the issue. The labor groups say, without a change, their funds will dry up.

Andy Chow

The state has deposited more than $650 million dollars into the rainy day fund. Despite being a large pot of money, Gov. John Kasich is warning state leaders to leave it alone. 

Andy Chow

A bill to overhaul the payday lending industry in Ohio is heading back to the House after the Senate approved the legislation with some changes. Consumer advocates are touting this as sensible reform while lenders argue this will put them out of business. 

Andy Chow

The Ohio Senate is introducing changes to a payday lending crackdown that passed the House by a big margin. Supporters of the legislation say it will help shutdown predatory lending and a cycle of debt. 

Dan Konik

The two people running for governor are laying out their plans for how to help children succeed. Both Mike DeWine and Rich Cordray say it all begins before the kids are even born. Cordray sees one clear difference between his take and that of his opponent.

Andy Chow

After failing to qualify candidates for the statewide ballot for the last two election cycles, libertarians are fighting to regain their party status in Ohio. The group has filed more than 100,000 signatures to put that party designation back on the ballot.

Karen Kasler

The Ohio Attorney General has filed an argument in court claiming ECOT’s agreements with its management and software service companies constitute a pattern of corrupt activity. The claim echoes complaints Democratic lawmakers have lodged for years. 

Dan Konik

Education advocates held a small rally outside of Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office, calling for him to investigate the now-closed Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. Democrats are trying to connect the Republican gubernatorial nominee to the online charter school scandal. But there’s a back-and-forth on the ECOT debate that will likely last the entire campaign season.

For the first time, a company has been given the go-ahead to start growing marijuana in Ohio. The group just received an official cultivator license from the state. Now more than a dozen other companies are lined up for inspections. The state’s medical marijuana program is still behind schedule.

Karen Kasler

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling on union laws caused a national stir and sent a shock wave to labor groups in Ohio. Some Republican lawmakers have been trying to pass bills around unions and collective bargaining for years. According to the top Senate leader, now they no longer have to, in regards to the public sector.

Andy Chow

The House and Senate sent two bills to the governor that attempt to clean up funding for the state’s online charter school system. Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle believe this is an important step toward more transparency and accountability. 

Andy Chow

The House passed the hotly debated “Pastor Protection” Act today. Democratic lawmakers argued that the bill would create a way for businesses to discriminate against LGBTQ people. The bill now goes on to the Senate.

Andy Chow

The bill to clampdown on payday lending interest rates and fees has hit another wall. After passing out of the House with strong support, Senate Republicans have halted the bill in committee in order to consider possible changes. 

Land Grant Brewing Company

A bill that would allow dogs on restaurant patios is moving its way through the Senate. Business groups see this as a way to let companies expand their creativity.

Jo Ingles

The House will hold session tomorrow without voting on a controversial piece of legislation that makes it easier to use lethal force in self-defense. Opponents of the bill say the so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill was shelved because of strong public outcry. 

Andy Chow

A bill that would overhaul the way Ohio mandates the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency is likely to get a vote in the Senate this week. 

Dan Konik

Lawmakers are preparing for a busy week at the Statehouse as they’re set to pass several big bills before leaving for summer break. This week could set the tone for the lawmaking agenda for the rest of the year.

Andy Chow

The new House speaker says now that the seven week long fight to elect him is over, it’s time to regain focus on several big issues. Among those - an effort to reform the state’s unemployment compensation fund. 

Andy Chow

A pro-gun group is taking two Ohio cities (Columbus, Cincinnati) to court over their new laws that tighten firearm regulation. The dispute revolves around a ban on bump stocks.

Andy Chow

Ohio’s top Democratic elected official is fighting the state’s process when it comes to scratching voters off the rolls. The new bill is in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling approving Ohio’s voter roll cleanup process. 

Andy Chow

The Ohio House passed a high-profile bill to reform criminal sentencing and strengthen probation monitoring. The bill is in response to the murder of an OSU student last year.

Dan Konik

The Ohio House is preparing to strip away more gun regulations making it easier to use lethal force in self-defense. This comes as the new House leader says Republican members aren’t close to approving new gun control measures. 

Andy Chow

More than $20 million could soon be pumped into projects that help keep Lake Erie clean. Most of that money would help fund equipment that helps limit nutrient runoff from farmland. But there are state leaders and environmental advocates who say that’s still not good enough. 

Andy Chow

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio should be doing everything it can to defend the part of the Affordable Care Act that requires health care coverage for people with preexisting conditions. This once again positions Kasich against President Donald Trump, who has said his administration will not fight for the law. 

Andy Chow

May’s 20,000 new private sector jobs in Ohio mean the state is outpacing the nation in job growth rate so far this year, though the state had no measurable job growth in all of last year. But Gov. John Kasich warns that this trend will be short-lived if leaders take their eye off the ball. 

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