Jo Ingles

Journalist/Producer

Contact Jo Ingles at jingles@statehousenews.org.

Jo Ingles covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and WBNS-TV's "Face the State". Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondents Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondents Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Ways to Connect

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

It appears the state’s new medical marijuana bill has cleared a hurdle. A public university has stepped forward to volunteer to serve as the state’s medical marijuana testing laboratory. 

July 2017
Andy Chow

After joining the House in voting to override six of Gov. John Kasich’s budget vetoes last month, the state Senate was expected to come back this week to consider overriding more. But the Senate has canceled its planned session. 

Jo Ingles

There’s a new scam that is prompting Ohioans to give personal information, thinking they are providing it to the health department. But that’s not the case.

Ohio and Colorado's state websites

A new bipartisan health care reform proposal meant to stabilize the Affordable Care Act urges President Trump and Congressional leaders to take immediate action. The plan put forth by Republican Ohio Governor John Kasich and Colorado’s Democratic Governor, John Hickenlooper, is drawing praise from some other governors too. 

Columbus Metropolitan Club, August 2016
Dan Konik

A nationally syndicated tabloid talk show host whose roots are in Ohio could be entering the race for Governor next year. Jerry Springer has talked about politics before but there are now signs that he is seriously considering jumping into the race. 

Taken at 10 a.m., Wednesday August 30, 2017
Jo Ingles

If you need to fill up your car, you had better do it soon. Gas prices in Ohio are ready to spike up because of flooding caused by what was Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

Along Lane Avenue, Columbus, Ohio
Jo Ingles

With the school year starting and many controversial issues on the left and the right to discuss, debate and protest, people have been talking a lot about free speech on college campuses. Two conservative Republican state lawmakers have come up with a new bill that they say will ensure all points of view are represented at Ohio’s public universities. 

Rising sales of booze in the Buckeye State are leaving the state agency that oversees liquor thirsting for more operators. 

Common Cause Ohio
The State of Ohio - Ohio Public Television

When elected office holders run a campaign, they are required by law to keep their campaign staff and messages separate from their official communications. Elected officials who are running for governor next year are handling their social media in different ways – some creating totally new accounts, but some aren’t separating them at all. 

Healthcare.org website

The last county in the nation that didn’t have a private insurance company to choose from on the Affordable Care Act exchange was in Ohio. But now people in that northwest Ohio county have an option. 

A Monumental Debate

Aug 24, 2017
Dan Konik

Just last year, Ohio replaced one of the two statues representing the state in Congress’ Statuary Hall because of its subject’s views on slavery. The statue of Gov. William Allen, who served from 1874 to 1876, was replaced with one of Thomas Edison. But what happened to the Allen statue? That question is especially relevant now that monuments to historical people whose views are now considered controversial have been the focus of debate and even vandalism. 

Jo Ingles

The number of children in Ohio who are placed in foster care continues to increase as the opioid crisis worsens. There’s a shortage of foster care families to meet the need.

Jo Ingles

Some state lawmakers say current law allows those convicted of importuning or soliciting a minor for sex over the internet, to escape serious penalties. Now there's a bill to toughen those punishments.

Dan Konik

Two bills that would permit dogs on restaurant patios statewide are being introduced in the House and Senate. The bill is as much about business as it is about dogs.

Karen Kasler

The House bill to allow dogs on restaurant patios in Ohio is getting a boost. There’s now a version of the bill being introduced in the Senate. 

Jo Ingles

Child enticement charges against a convicted sex offender in central Ohio were recently dropped because an Ohio Supreme Court ruling had thrown out part of the statute. Now state lawmakers are trying to fix that part of the law.

The State of Ohio

Democrats in the state Legislature are supporting a new bill that would officially denounce white nationalists and neo-Nazis. 

New Albany
Jo ingles

Facebook plans to build its tenth data center in New Albany in Central Ohio, to open in 2019. The huge $750 million project in Central Ohio comes with a mixture of local and state funding incentives. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Starting next month, the Ohio Democratic Party will hold as many as six debates in the upcoming months to introduce voters its candidates for governor next year. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Investors who want a license to grow medical marijuana for Ohio’s new program will have to wait until November to find out whether they will receive one. 

credit Facebook.com

A social media giant is developing a huge data center in Central Ohio. 

The state’s new medical marijuana program is supposed to begin a little more than a year from now. But there are still lots of questions, such as who will grow the plants, what conditions they’ll be grown under, and who will do lab testing on the cannabis before patients get access to it. 

April 2017
Land Grant Brewing Company

Bars and restaurants that have patios statewide have been welcoming canines and their human friends to sit down to have dinner and drinks in those outdoor spaces finding themselves in a quandary. That’s because those dog owners, rescue groups, and businesses are at odds with health departments over a current state law that prohibits dogs on patios of businesses that serve food and drinks. Now there’s a movement…..and legislation…..that seeks to change that.

The U.S. Justice Department has taken an unusual move. It reversed its position on a high-profile US Supreme Court case involving Ohio’s process for maintaining voter rolls. 

Ohio Attorney General's office

Ohio’s opioid crisis is causing problems for the state’s crime lab. The Bureau of Criminal Investigation, which processes chemical evidence for cases throughout Ohio, is having a hard time getting everything done on a timely basis. So, the lab has come up with a solution.

Dan Konik

If you need to buy some school supplies for the kids or even some new clothes for yourself, this might be the weekend to do it. You won’t pay sales tax on many items purchased in Ohio because of the state’s sales tax holiday. 

Statehouse News Bureau

The failure of the U.S. Senate’s proposed plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Health Care Act leaves the program intact. But most Senators, on both sides of the aisle, say if the program is kept, changes must be made to make it function on a long term basis. 

Jo Ingles

The candidates in next year's race for governor have filed their fundraising reports. 

Ohio Department of Insurance
Jo Ingles

About 11,000 enrollees in the Affordable Health Care Act program in nineteen Ohio counties who recently found themselves without a single health insurance company to cover them are now getting some options. 

Dan Konik

Ohio’s jobless rate for last month creeped up again, but the state maintains there’s still good news in the numbers. 

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