Government/Politics

Political news

Karen Kasler

It’s been six years since delinquent taxpayers in Ohio were given a chance to pay up without penalties. The new state budget gives them another opportunity at the beginning of next year.

via internet search

Ohio’s largest group representing abortion opponents is cheering news that two clinics that offered abortions in the Buckeye State have closed their doors.  

The Auditorium Conundrum

Jul 14, 2017
Dan Konik

(A more comprehensive version of this story is also on this week's "The State of Ohio" show on Ohio Public Television. You can find that story by looking under the State of Ohio tab at the top of the homepage.)

School districts who are building new schools with state money are sometimes surprised by one of the rules. Those dollars cannot be used for something that is in many of the older buildings being replaced….auditoriums. That creates some tough decisions for school districts as they decide how to move forward with their building plans. Take a look at how some districts are doing it.

Dan Konik

A couple of large wind farms have cropped up in Ohio over the past couple of years, but the state still hasn’t seen a big development with solar power. That could change very soon with not one but three big solar farms in the works.

Wikimedia Commons

Changes are under way for how much time a person might spend in prison for a non-violent crime. These criminal justice reforms will cut down on prison time in exchange for more community based rehabilitation. Supporters believe this will not only save the state money but improve community safety.

Daniel Konik/OGT

The state budget director took a lot of heat for tax collections that came in nearly a billion dollars below his projections.  That office is trying to make sure it doesn’t miss with its forecast for the new budget. But as he notes on "The State of Ohio" this weekend, there are still a lot of economic uncertainties to deal with.  

Statehouse News Bureau

As Senators in Washington continue to grapple with how to reform the Affordable Care Act, Ohio’s two members explain why they have not embraced plans that have been introduced so far. They talk about what needs to be done to it to win their support.

Outside Riffe Tower, Columbus Ohio
Jo Ingles

Ohio is set to execute a death row inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in three and a half years. Death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

Karen Kasler

A national initiative to revive civility and respect in political talk is launching tomorrow at the Columbus Metropolitan Club.

Jo Ingles

One of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes overridden by the House last week involves a tax on managed care organizations that helps raise money for counties and transit authorities. And those local groups are hoping Senators go along with that override.

zlikovec/Shutterstock

Lawmakers and health care providers are praising a change in Ohio law that expands access to breast and cervical cancer screenings to hundreds of thousands of people. 

Karen Kasler

Nine of the 11 vetoes that state representatives voted to override in the state budget this week are related to Medicaid, though not the big veto on the plan to freeze Medicaid expansion enrollment next year. That was likely no accident, because Medicaid was in the spotlight and under the microscope this time.

Ohio House

State Auditor Dave Yost has recently become a vocal critic of the state’s largest online charter school. But one lawmaker thinks Yost should recuse himself from any further investigations into the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. 

Karen Kasler

The state budget director was off by almost a billion dollars in its projections on tax collections for the fiscal year. But his prediction that the year that ended last week would close in the black was right.

Andy Chow

Oil and gas companies could be one step closer to drilling on state-owned land after the House overrode a veto by Gov. John Kasich. 

Karen Kasler

There may have been occasional disagreements between Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich, but he’d issued more than a hundred vetoes in his seven years in office without one being overturned. Today, that changed dramatically.

Andy Chow

The Ohio House of Representatives overrode 11 of the 47 vetoes Gov. John Kasich made recently to the state’s proposed budget. But the House didn’t override the most controversial one.

Dan Konik

Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate went six years without even a serious threat of overriding a veto from Gov. John Kasich. Today the House overrode not one but 11 Kasich vetoes. 

Andy Chow

A bill that would allow licensed permit holders to carry concealed weapons into gun-free zones unless they’re asked to leave is on its way to the Senate after passing the House. 

medicalmarijuana.ohio.gov

The window to apply to become growers under Ohio’s medical marijuana program has closed, with the state receiving 185 applications – all with nonrefundable fees attached.

Dan Konik

Hundreds of advocates gathered on the steps of the Statehouse to rally against a vote that would freeze Medicaid enrollment for certain people next year. This could be a last minute push as the House considers taking that up tomorrow.

at Ohio State University
Jo Ingles

Representatives in the Ohio House have a session scheduled for tomorrow morning. They will take up a bill that would make changes to rules for constructing new schools and a bill to change gun laws. But there’s no word yet on whether lawmakers will try to override Gov. John Kasich’s line item vetoes in the state budget.

Andy Chow

Fourth of July celebrations are taking place throughout the state but Ohio lawmakers are likely not finding this summer holiday to be carefree. That's because Gov. John Kasich vetoed 47 items when he signed the budget Friday. One of those is the controversial plan to freeze the Medicaid expansion program in Ohio in July of next year. Some former state lawmakers say they know what it’s like to walk a mile in the shoes of legislators who can’t get work off their minds.

Jo Ingles

Gov. John Kasich used his pen to veto 47 items in the new state budget. Among those vetoes was a plan to freeze expansion of Medicaid in 2018. 

Andy Chow

State lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow people to carry concealed weapons into gun free zones without being criminally liable. 

Iberdrola Renewables

Lawmakers are about to take a long break after spending the last five months on the $65 billion budget. Leaders are already looking at what could be the next big issue in the House and Senate.

Statehouse News Bureau

It may seem like the budget is coming down to the wire. But waiting till the last minute to get the budget in place is pretty typical.

Andy Chow

The state auditor is looking into filing a restraining order against the largest online charter school district in Ohio, which is already facing a $60 million bill from the state for inflating its enrollment figures. Auditor Dave Yost is trying to get the Electronic Classroom Of Tomorrow, or ECOT, to stop using taxpayer money for politically-motivated ads. 

Columbus, Ohio
Dan Konik

Along with the overall $65 million budget, this week the state legislature also passed a $581 million budget for the Bureau of Workers' Compensation. 

Statehouse News Bureau

Business and labor leaders, as well as Ohio’s cities, are very concerned about how some money is being moved around to balance the budget in the face of a billion dollar projected shortfall. 

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