Medicaid

Karen Kasler

In a little over two weeks, mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans will be moved into Medicaid managed care. But many behavioral health and family services providers say this huge change is straining their finances. But the group that represents Ohio’s health insurers says the move can’t be delayed.

ideastream

While the Speaker saga drags on, there are more than 150 bills that are awaiting action in the House. One is a measure that would preserve money for a program that serves more than 800 at risk kids with severe behavioral needs each year.

theohiocouncil.org

The state is moving mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care by July 1, and it’s the biggest and most complicated change the behavioral health system in Ohio has ever seen. But a survey of more than a hundred of those providers shows the redesign is straining their finances and could shut them down.

Ohio Association of Community Action Agencies' "State of Poverty 2017" report

A group that advocates for low-income people has issued its annual report on the state of poverty in Ohio. 

Dan Konik

A healthcare advocacy group delivered hundreds of letters to the state Medicaid office to express their opposition to work requirements for certain Medicaid recipients. 

Karen Kasler

State lawmakers want more information about the billing practices of companies that handle prescription drug benefits for millions of Medicaid recipients in Ohio. That's because they’re being accused of using the pharmacies they operate to drive smaller pharmacies out of business.

Director of Ohio Office of Health Transformation
Statehouse News Bureau

A program that helps working families in Ohio afford health care for their children with serious medical conditions is in limbo right now. 

Andy Chow

The Trump Administration is clearing the way for states to attach work requirements for Medicaid. The announcement has sparked outrage among health care advocates. This can mean some changes for the state’s program.

Monkey Business Images/SHUTTERSTOCK

Time is running out for Congress to approve more funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program before the money dries up. It's operated by states and Ohio has a plan for the program known as CHIP in case Congress doesn’t act.

Ohio Department of Medicaid

The Trump Administration has signaled it’ll give flexibility to states when it comes to how they operate their Medicaid programs. That will likely open the door for Ohio to implement a controversial measure.

Andy Chow

For the first time since lawmakers required it in the budget, Gov. John Kasich’s administration made a trip to the Statehouse to ask a panel of legislators to release hundreds of millions of dollars to fund Medicaid. 

Andy Chow

The state is redesigning the way mental health and addiction services are covered under health care plans. Those services are critical in fighting the deadly opioid crisis. That means a lot of testing is needed before implementing the new system.

ohio.gov/colorado.gov

For months, Republican Gov. John Kasich has been talking about his work with Democratic Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper on health insurance reform. A proposal from the governors may be close, but it won’t touch one of the most expensive and controversial points of the federal health care law.

Karen Kasler

There were a lot of cuts in this new state budget, largely because tax revenues were off nearly $850 million dollars for the last fiscal year. There’s one budget cut that’s small, but some worry it could have a huge impact on people who really need that money.

Karen Kasler

Nine of the 11 vetoes that state representatives voted to override in the state budget this week are related to Medicaid, though not the big veto on the plan to freeze Medicaid expansion enrollment next year. That was likely no accident, because Medicaid was in the spotlight and under the microscope this time.

Karen Kasler

The state budget director was off by almost a billion dollars in its projections on tax collections for the fiscal year. But his prediction that the year that ended last week would close in the black was right.

Karen Kasler

There may have been occasional disagreements between Ohio’s Republican-dominated House and Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich, but he’d issued more than a hundred vetoes in his seven years in office without one being overturned. Today, that changed dramatically.

Lane V. Erickson/SHUTTERSTOCK

State lawmakers are trying to hash out a final budget deal that they can send to the governor’s desk. This includes how they’ll spend money to fight the opioid epidemic while closing a more than $1 billion budget hole. But there’s a big issue that looms over the discussion.

Statehouse News Bureau

Lawmakers and the Kasich administration have gone back and forth on a budget issue that would change the way people with long term health problems would receive medical care. That provision is still on the table as the Senate works to craft their final draft of the budget bill.

The state wants to change to the way mental health and addiction services are billed and coded, to align with national standards. But providers of those services, which are already stressed because of the opioid crisis, are very concerned.

Connor Perrett

Gov. John Kasich has been gaining national attention for criticizing the health care proposal coming from Congressional Republicans, especially when it comes to cutting Medicaid coverage. Kasich says there’s not much he and other state leaders could do if those cuts happen.

Ohio Department of Medicaid

The proposed repeal of the Affordable Care Act could cost Ohio as much as $8.5 billion over the next eight years, according to a report out this morning from a statewide research group.

Emilie Zhang/Shutterstock.com

Pharmacy costs for Ohio’s Medicaid program are lower than the national average by more than nine percent. And health insurance companies are crediting managed care plans for the cut in costs. 

Karen Kasler

A new report from a group representing 15 health insurers operating in Ohio says managed care is saving Medicaid a lot of money.

medicaid.ohio.gov

The federal government has rejected a plan proposed by state lawmakers to require about a million Ohio Medicaid recipients to pay premiums for their coverage.

OGT/The Ohio Channel

A conservative think tank that’s been opposed to Medicaid expansion is sounding off on reports that the state may face a billion dollar problem in the next budget, set to be introduced in January.

Twitter

The state is working with urban community leaders to pinpoint specific ways of cutting down on the infant mortality rate. 

Ohio Department of Medicaid

The state will soon start the process that could allow for controversial changes for around a million Ohioans on Medicaid. But it’s a long, tough road to getting those changes put in place.