Statehouse News Bureau

As Senators in Washington continue to grapple with how to reform the Affordable Care Act, Ohio’s two members explain why they have not embraced plans that have been introduced so far. They talk about what needs to be done to it to win their support.

Outside Riffe Tower, Columbus Ohio
Jo Ingles

Ohio is set to execute a death row inmate later this month. If it happens, it will be the first execution in the state in three and a half years. Death penalty opponents are trying to stop it.

Andy Chow

The state department of education can start collecting $60 million from Ohio’s largest online charter school. This comes after the Ohio Supreme Court decided not to grant an injunction. However, the fight is far from over.

Karen Kasler

A national initiative to revive civility and respect in political talk is launching tomorrow at the Columbus Metropolitan Club.

Jo Ingles

One of Gov. John Kasich’s vetoes overridden by the House last week involves a tax on managed care organizations that helps raise money for counties and transit authorities. And those local groups are hoping Senators go along with that override.

zlikovec/Shutterstock

Lawmakers and health care providers are praising a change in Ohio law that expands access to breast and cervical cancer screenings to hundreds of thousands of people. 

Karen Kasler

Nine of the 11 vetoes that state representatives voted to override in the state budget this week are related to Medicaid, though not the big veto on the plan to freeze Medicaid expansion enrollment next year. That was likely no accident, because Medicaid was in the spotlight and under the microscope this time.

Ohio House

State Auditor Dave Yost has recently become a vocal critic of the state’s largest online charter school. But one lawmaker thinks Yost should recuse himself from any further investigations into the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow. 

Karen Kasler

The state budget director was off by almost a billion dollars in its projections on tax collections for the fiscal year. But his prediction that the year that ended last week would close in the black was right.

Andy Chow

Oil and gas companies could be one step closer to drilling on state-owned land after the House overrode a veto by Gov. John Kasich. 

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